A recent study from the University of Melbourne* suggests organisations that place a premium on workplace safety are also more productive.

The research, which drew on data gathered from a number of different studies conducted over the last decade, found that there is a significant correlation between highly productive workers and a safe environment. The reverse trend is also true – companies with poor health and safety regime are less productive as a result.

The study's author, Professor Peter Gahan, suggested that turning a low performing company into a high performing one may require businesses to re-evaluate the amount of work health and safety training and support they offer to staff.

"There is a strong case to be made that Australian businesses need to invest more to protect [their] employees from accidents, and to protect themselves from the costs associated with workplace injury," Mr Gahan stated.

"Finding and training suitable replacements is far more expensive than reducing risks in the workplace in the first place."

Along with increasing the awareness among staff of workplace health and safety challenges, the report made a number of other recommendations. For example, the study suggested businesses tailor their health and safety approach to the size and scope of a business, to ensure that the training and support offered is appropriate for a company's scope.

Another key suggestion to come out of the study was to ensure that an individual within the company has operational oversight over workplace health and safety. By establishing a specific person to oversee these regulations, organisations will be able to have much greater control over their safety initiatives.

By making these changes, it is suggested that companies will be able to build a safer and more productive workforce, in turn creating a much more efficient business. 

If you want to ensure your business has a successful induction process, make sure you request a free trail of WorkPro's work health and safety training software.

*University of Melbourne Australian Work Health and Safety Strategy 2012-2022, October 24, 2014.

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